burial grounds (19th century)

burial grounds - Quaker / Friends

Dealing with burials in 19th century Yeovil

 

The Quaker Burial Ground in Preston Lane (today's Preston Road) dates to 1689 when it was carved out of the corner of a field known as Batt's Corner.

In 1852 in his Report to the General Board of Health concerning, among other items, Yeovil's burial grounds, Thomas Rammell wrote the following concerning burials in the Friends, or Quaker, burial ground in Preston Road.

"The Quakers Burial-Ground is situated about 300 yards beyond the turnpike gate, on the Preston Road, and is therefore quite removed from the town. It is a very old ground, established upwards of a century. It is about one-eighth of an acre in extent, and the interments are few, about 19 having taken place in the last 29 years. It is a dry ground, and lies high."

In fact Quaker meetings were first held in Yeovil in 1654, fifteen years earlier than the date on the wall of the burial ground. It was, however, privately owned and in his will of 1716 Yeovil glover Samuel Goodford the Elder bequeathed the burial ground to his son William Goodford. The first Quaker meeting house was dated from 1690 and was built in Kingston.

On the 1886 Ordnance Survey the site is shown as "Friends' Burial Ground (Disused)" although, of course as seen in this photograph of 2007, the burial ground remains today albeit locked. Mounted in its boundary wall facing Preston Road is the stone, photographed below, which is inscribed "Friends Burial Ground 1689".

The 'Grave-Maker' for the Yeovil Burying Ground for the period 1784 to 1792 was George White.

For a list of Quaker Burials in Yeovil - click here

 

gallery

 


Courtesy of Bill and Audrey Robertson

Four of the six headstones, photographed in the 1990s.

 



The stone set into the burial ground's boundary wall, facing Preston Road. Photographed 2013.

 

The title page of a Quaker Burial Register.