whitmash & white's bank

whitmash & white's bank

Hendford

 

Before joint stock banks were permitted outside London by the Act of 1826, the financial needs of local businessmen were met by private country banks, which provided safe custody for deposits of gold, issued banknotes and honoured cheques.

This private bank was established as Henry Whitmash & Richard Brown in Wincanton in about 1796. Henry George Whitmash was a Yeovil coachbuilder and glover. It was known as Whitmash & Co by 1805, Whitmash & White by 1811 and Henry Whitmash & William Lambert White by 1813.

Henry Whitmash was a Yeovil coachbuilder and William Lambert White was a solicitor in Yeovil. Both Whitmash and White served as Churchwardens and trustees of Woborn's Almshouse, and both became Town Commissioners in 1830, the latter acting as treasurer until his death in 1845.

In 1808 the bank opened a branch in Yeovil and from then it was also known as the Yeovil & Wincanton Bank. This was in a building adjoining the old Angel Inn.

The Wincanton business appears to have closed in 1818. In 1835 the bank was acquired by Stuckey's Banking Co, but the trading name was retained until 1837. Banknotes were printed in £1, £5, and £20 denominations, but only the £1 and £5 notes are known to have been issued.

 

GALLERY

 


© Trustees of the British Museum

The obverse and reverse of a five pound note of the Yeovil & Wincanton Bank featuring a drawing of St John's church. From the period 1808 to 1835, at which time £5 would be worth in excess of £300 at 2017's value. Notes were printed in £1, £5, and £20 denominations, but only the £1 and £5 notes are known to have been issued.