orchard street

orchard street

Named for the orchards it was built on

 

Orchard Street was a development started in the mid-1890s by local businessman, town councillor and local 'character' Levi Beer. He named Orchard Street after Daniell's Orchard that it was built on, indeed much of today's Yeovil was orchards at the time.

In the 1846 Tithe Apportionment Daniell's Orchard (Parcel 609), was recorded as measuring 3a 1r 30p. It was owned by Jane Newman and Berkley Newman was the tenant.

Levi Beer was also responsible for building Beer Street, named after himself. When the name was approved by the council, one wit remarked that 'Cider Street' might be more appropriate.

Levi Beer and was fervently against party politics; he was locally famous for his election slogans such as "Don't vote for water, vote for Beer" and, on standing for election in Queen Victoria's Jubilee Year of 1887, his election slogan was "No cold-water Jubilee - vote for Beer".

Orchard Street appears on the 1901 Ordnance Survey (shown below) nearly complete but Westland Road, of course, didn’t exist. Beer Street was at this time under construction and continued north to join up with Huish which ended at the junction with Grove Avenue, with fields beyond.

 

MAP






The 1901 Ordnance Survey showing Orchard Street at centre, all but complete by this time.

 

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Orchard Street photographed from near the junction with Huish, around 1895. Two years later the building at extreme right would become Yeovil's first branch outlet of the Yeovil & District Co-operative Society, as seen in the next photograph.

 

This branch outlet opened in 1897. The archway led through to its own bakery and stables at the rear of the premises. The manager was Walter Thorne.

 

A bit like a 'spot the difference' photograph, this is the same building photographed in 2013.

 

The western side of Orchard Street, photographed in the late 1950s or early 1960s.

 

Orchard Street at centre, seen from the junction with West Street / Westland Road / Beer Street in the mid-1960s.